Robbery and blackmail with Bitcoins - The H Security: News ...

[Table] IAmA dark web expert, investigative journalist and true crime author. I’ve met dark web kingpins in far flung prisons and delved the murky depths of child predator forums. I’ve written six books and over a dozen Casefile podcast episodes. AMA (part 2/2)

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Around here nobody talks about the argument that increased regulation of the internet would help stop child predators. Is that true, and if so where do you fall on the Net Neutrality vs law enforcement spectrum? No I don't think that's true at all. Child predators have been around much longer than the internet, and I would argue child abuse was more prevalent 50+ years ago when children were seen and not heard and it wasn't talked about. The dark web hasn't created more predators, it has just given them a new place to gather and hang out.
The one thing I found really interesting when I was lurking the forums of the child predators was their frustration about how children are now taught from a very young age that certain touching and acts are wrong and that they shouldn't keep certain secrets. It came up over and over again that they could not abuse certain children because they knew those children had someone they would tell. It was pretty clear that education was a child's best defence against getting abused.
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That's so interesting, thanks for the AMA! Can you remember any other thing that a child could do in order to protect himself from being abused? What other characteristics do the abusers hate in potential victims? That seems to be the main one. Kids who speak up and who have close relationships with one or more people they are likely to confide in
What do folks talk about in the child predator forums? Do they like give each other advice on how to improve their craft? Yes, quite literally. The give each other tips on how not to get caught, how to edit out incriminating details in videos, how to drug children, techniques for convincing kids not to tell etc
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Given your insight into how predators operate, do you have any advice for parents on protecting their kids? I'll cut'n'paste a response i gave to someone else about this, because it was something that really stuck out to me:
The one thing I found really interesting when I was lurking the forums of the child predators was their frustration about how children are now taught from a very young age that certain touching and acts are wrong and that they shouldn't keep certain secrets. It came up over and over again that they could not abuse certain children because they knew those children had someone they would tell. It was pretty clear that education was a child's best defence against getting abused. Kids who speak up and who have close relationships with one or more people they are likely to confide in
Has the exponential increase in Bitcoin value affected darknet dealers in any profound way? I can imagine that some drug dealers were sitting on quite a large sum of Bitcoin when the value shot up. Crypto purists hate to admit it, but bitcoin would not be where it is today without Silk Road. It was sitting at less than a dollar when Silk Road began and the markets showed a robust use case for cryptocurrency and as the markets grew, so did the demand for bitcoin. It also provided real-life use data for those who were not interested in drugs but who weren't sure if it had practical application. When SR went down, Bitcoin was at about $650 and it continued to grow as adoption became more mainstream. There are many many stories of drug dealers (and at least one faux-hitman!) who gained most of their wealth not by selling the drugs, but by the growth in value of their bitcoin holdings
Since you have a lot of experience with them online. Do you think pedophiles(not child abusers) should be treated as criminals, or as people suffering from a mental illness? Contact offenders should be treated as criminals, because they are criminals. They have abused or hurt someone. Same with those who support the creation and dissemination of child abuse materials.
Pedophiles who do not act on their urges should be given as much help as humanly possible.
Are there any mysterious or suspicious pages or communities that you haven’t been able to access? Anything that seems especially weird? there are a lot of Russian communities that I can't access, mostly because I don't speak Russian. Some of the more technical hacking communities have entry barriers that I'm not technical enough to score an invite to
How much these bad people really exist out there? Hundreds? Thousands? More? It depends what you mean by bad. If you mean people who use the dark web to buy drugs (who I do not consider bad) then there are many many thousands. There are also thousands of people who deal in stolen information to make money.
Unfortunately there are also thousands of child predators and the dark web has provided a "safe space" for them to come together to share materials and "tips". I hope this is where most of the resources of law enforcement are concentrated
Ehy mine is a rare question: what do you know about art on dark web? I'm talking about the black market made of stolen important pieces from museums, art used as value to money laundry and other criminal affairs I'm an artist and what I know is people don't think too much about the dark side of art and probably they need to open their eyes about I really haven't come across much in the way of that. Some of the markets have an "art" section, but that is mostly blotter art
How accurate are the legends? Any legends in particular? For a lowdown copied from a post I made in another forum:
1Red Rooms  The one that is most persistent is the myth of the "Red Room" - live streaming of torture/rape that ends in the murder of the victim and which people can pay to watch, or even bid to type in commands for the torturer to carry out (highest bid wins!). The most famous was the “ISIS Red Room” pictured above, where people could provide instructions to torture captured terrorists - you can read what happened here.
People have this idea of Hostel with webcams exist all over the dark web, but you just need an invite to get into them. It's ridiculous. They don't exist. They certainly wouldn't exist on Tor. But people are desperate to believe and they always come back with "You can't prove they don't exist, people are crazy, therefore they must exist." Picture my eyes rolling here.
2.Hitman sites
I don't think many people are taken in by the hitmen sites anymore, though the press loves playing up the fact that there are sites offering up hitman services. But every single one of them has turned out to be a scam, especially Besa Mafia, the one that did the most marketing. Again, you can read about it at the same link as above.
3.Exotic animals  People are always asking where they can find markets for exotic animals. Obviously the illegal trade in exotic animals exists, and some communications and transactions may well take place over Tor, but there are no markets like the drug markets where you can go and look at a picture and then put a tiger or ocelot or something into your basket and buy it with bitcoin.
SO WHAT DOES HAPPEN ON THE DARK WEB?
1.People buy and sell drugs.
The drug markets are more busy than ever. You have probably heard of Silk Road, the most famous online drug market that got busted a few years ago and the owner sent to prison for two consecutive life terms? A lot of people thought that was the end of drugs being sold on the dark web. In fact, dark web sales of drugs have tripled since the shutdown of Silk Road.
The reason people buy drugs this way is that for many they offer a safer alternative for people who are going to do drugs anyway. There is no possibility of any violence. The vast majority of the time a buyer knows exactly what they are getting, because of the feedback and rating system. That's not the case in a nightclub, or even friends-of-friends, where you just blindly accept that the pill, powder or tab is what the seller says it is.
2.People buy and sell other illegal things
Mostly they buy and sell stolen credit cards and financial information, fake IDs (though lots of these are scams), personal information, “dumps” of hacked data and fraud-related items. For a long time, a seller was making a fortune selling fake discount coupons that really worked.
3.People access and create childporn  Unlike the other markets, the CP market is generally not for money, but rather they are groups who swap vile images and videos for free. The worst of the worst is called “hurtcore’. Thankfully, most of the people behind the worst sites have been arrested and put in jail.
4.People talk about stuff
There are plenty of sites, forums and chatrooms where people talk about all sorts of things - conspiracies, aliens, weird stuff. They take advantage of the anonymity.
5.People anonymously release information
Whistleblowers use the dark web to release information and make sure their identities won't be compromised. You will find Wikileaks, for example, on the dark web.
6.People surf the web anonymously
The number 1 thing people use the dark web for is just to surf the web completely anonymously. Not everybody wants to be tracked by advertisers.
I have a question: what are the odds of the casual Darkweb drug buyer - not buying mega loads all the time - the occasional purchase - what are the risks of being busted? Kinda figuring pretty low. But you’re the expert. What do you think? Obviously there is always a risk, but the risk is very low. It is rare for personal amounts to be seized. Even if a package is seized, there's usually no resources to follow it up. Many people report simply receiving a letter from Customs saying they have seized what they believe is contraband and the person has a choice of going to claim it or it will be destroyed. Even if LE does knock on the door there is plausible deniability: "I don't know who sent that stuff to me".
So yeah, rare, but it does happen. You might be the unlucky one
How do you find things on the dark web without search engines? There are a lot of entry sites, set up with links to the most popular places. You can generally get a link to one of them by browsing places like reddit. From there it is a matter of checking out different places, people will put links in forums etc.
I also use a Pastebin where people paste sites they have made/found, and a Fresh Onion site, which crawls all the newly-populated .onion addresses
Hi. there!! Thank you for answering questions. Mine is very simple. How do sellers get the drugs to people? Regular mail? That's always puzzled me bc I'd assume USPS, UPS, fedEx or any other mail carrier would catch at least some goods. If people are ordering drugs, particularly in powder form, for personal use, they can be flattened, sealed in MBB (moisture barrier baggies) and sent in a regular business envelope, indistinguishable from billions of other envelopes going through the postal system every day. The chances of a particular package being intercepted is very low.
Some people take the extra precaution of having the person taking delivery of the drugs different to the person/household that is ordering them.
How did you move from being a corporate lawyer to researching and writing about dark web? I was in London, working for one of the most conservative law firms in the world when the Global Financial Crisis hit. I liked the job but it struck me when people were losing their livelihoods that I was working for the bad guys. I'd always wanted to be a writer so when I came back to Australia I quit law and enrolled in a writing course planning to be a novelist, but I discovered I was better at journalism. I first wrote for newspapers here about Silk Road and it grew from there
I've always wanted to check out the dark web, what is a normal day for you look like on there? Can you give me any tips on how to safely surf the dark web? A normal day looks like me sitting at my desk writing things on my computer. When I'm researching a book or a case I venture away from my computer to trials and to interview people (at least I did pre-COVID)
There is nothing inherently unsafe in surfing the dark web. All the usual precautions you take surfing the clearweb apply. Don't visit any child exploitation sites - it will be pretty obvious that's what they are by the names/descriptions before you log in.
It is only when you want to do more than surfing - e.g. buying drugs etc - that you need to do a LOT of homework or you will absolutely get scammed
Is there anything good about the dark web? It depends what you are into. A lot of academic research has concluded that the darknet markets provide a safer way for people to buy and use drugs, due to the ratings of vendors, services that independently test and report back on batches of drugs, doctor on staff ready to answer questions, no violence in transactions etc.
News sites provide a dark web option so that whistleblowers can safety provide information and upload documents that get stripped of any identifying metadata before being available.
It bypasses firewalls and allows for secure communications under hostile regimes
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How does this make you feel about the idea of the decriminalization of drugs? I've always been for full legalization of drugs, and studying the darknet markets just proved I was right.
I was invited to an experts roundtable in Portugal about drugs and cybercrime a few years ago and the Portugal model of decriminalisation has been a great success
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Hey, you are still answering. Been reading this thread for 1-2 hours now. Thank you so much for all the good work and info! Always been intrigued by this topic, downloaded tor once to explore a bit but couldn’t and deleted it right away, to be on the safer side. Great insights. Thanks! I've been writing it for about 14 hours. Going a bit loopy
How was working on Casefile? What's the production process like? Which episodes did u do?? I have listened to... all of them.... I absolutely LOVE working for Casefile. I am a freelancer, so I source and write my own cases and then sell the scripts to Casefile. I've done at least a dozen, but some of my most popular are Amy Allwine, Mark & John, Ella Tundra, Leigh Leigh, Rebecca Schaeffer...
As for the production process, once I have sold the script to them, a staff member edits them and then they are passed on to Casey to narrate. After that, they go to Mike for sound editing, music etc. They are the best team ever
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Oh, Leigh Leigh was so well written!! How do you choose which stories to write? Do you just pick true crime you're interested in? Thank you! I have a huge list of potential episodes. Any time I come across an interesting crime on reddit, or in the news or wherever I make a note of it. Then I just pick one when it comes time to write a new script.
Sometimes I've been personally involved (e.g. Amy Allwine), gone to trials etc. Those are always the best ones
Hi Eiley, your twitter just reminded me of this AMA :) What are your thoughts on bitcoin? And would you prefer to be paid in crypto or fiat? OOOOH, I know that name! Love & Light to you!
I like Bitcoin and I wish I had a whole lot of it and like many many people, I wish I had kept the first crypto I bought at something like $4 a coin :D I do not have a whole lot of it but I do have a little bit. I like the philosophy behind it and in theory it should change the world. However the reality is that the vast majority of it is concentrated in a very few hands which allows for market manipulation and stops it being useful as a post-fiat currency.
As long as I'm getting paid, I'm pretty happy!
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I too remember your name Pluto! Such a decent human ❤ he is!! True OG right there <3
Is the dark web subject to more racism than its counterpart, the world wide web? There are some white power sites and that sort of thing and the chans are even more uncensored than the clearweb ones (4chan, 8chan) but to be honest they are the same cesspools in different spots. Drug forums don't seem to be very racist. I've seen worse on Twitter
Have you seen any consequential political or social organizing being carried out on the dark web? Not directly, but the dark web helped facilitate the Arab Spring uprising in 2010 by allowing activists to remain anonymous and to access blocked websites and social media. Wikileaks, obviously. Some white supremacy organizations seem to use it to coordinate attacks, but they are not places I'm keen to hang out in.
What’s the most expensive thing for sale you’ve seen on the dark web? What was surprisingly inexpensive? I can't remember specific listings, but there were sometimes sales of things like coke by the kilo, so that sort of thing I guess.
LSD could easily be found for $1/tab and one huge dealer gave it away for free if it was for personal use
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1. I’m going to ask a couple in hopes that one will catch your interest! I know you’re anonymous on the dark web, but even so, have you ever felt worried about your safety? I actually made the decision to be upfront and honest about who I am on the dark web, so I use the name OzFreelancer (which is easily traceable to my real name) on all the dark web sites where i went looking for interviews. The people there had the option of talking to me or not, so they had no reason to want to harm me.
2. I’ve found your comments about your relationship with Yura fascinating. Did y’all develop a friendship? Did you build any other relationships that stand out in your mind? Since you were straightforward about being on the dark web for stories, did people seem reluctant to communicate, or were they excited for the opportunity to divulge a secret? We do have a friendship of sorts, it is really quite weird. I do hope to met him one day. I met all of the senior staff of Silk Road other than the Dread Pirate Roberts himself and keep in touch with some. Some people wanted nothing to do with me of course, but many more were happy to talk to me. i think sometimes it was a relief to them to be able to talk to one person who they knew was who they said they were.
3. On violent forums, did users ever express remorse, guilt, shame, or anything indicative of some recognition that what they were viewing/seeking was awful? Do you see doxxing teams on the dark web working together to uncover info, or is the info already there through previous hacks/breaches, and someone just accesses and releases it? Sorry if any of those don’t make sense! I’m not familiar with the dark web lingo but am so intrigued by your work. Not really. I think if they were contributing to the forums, they were comfortable with who they were and what they were doing. Many of the "regular" pedophiles expressed revulsion about Lux and hurtcore sites though
these have probably been asked before but has there ever been a time where you where genuinely been scared for your life and whats the most messed up thing you've witnessed did you have any help? Yeah both things have been answered in this thread, so I'll cut'n'paste
The only time I've felt even slightly in danger despite all this nosing around in there was when I helped uncover a hitman scam. The owner of Besa Mafia, the most profitable murder-for-hire site in history, came after me when I started writing about him. He made loads of threats ("you don't know who I am, but I know who you are and where you live") but that wasnt scary, as I had access to the backdoor of his site thanks to a friendly hacker and knew he didn't really want to hurt anybody.
It took a bit of a darker turn when he told the people who had signed up to work as hitmen on his site - and who he made video themselves burning cars with signs on them to advertise how legit his site was, then never sent them the promised money for doing so - that I was the owner of the site who had ripped them off. That could have become ugly, but luckily even the thugs weren't dumb enough to believe him.
The only other time I've been a bit nervous was when Homeland Security wanted to have a "friendly" meeting with me on one of my trips to the US to attend a trial. They were friendly, but scary too.
The most frightening experience I've ever had is coming face to face with Lux, the owner of Pedoempire and Hurt2theCore, the most evil and reviled person on the entire dark web. He was responsible for procuring and hosting Daisy's Destruction, the most repulsive video ever made, created by Peter Scully, whose crimes were so bad, the Philippines are considering reinstating the death penalty especially for him.
It wasn't frightening because Lux was frightening - he was anything but. It was frightening because he looked so inoffensive and normal.
It was frightening because he was living proof that monsters walk among us and we never know.
[deleted] It is absolute crap for browsing the clearweb, and a lot of sites detect that it is odd traffic and you have to solve their CAPTCHAs before doing the most basic things
I’m sure you’ve seen some really bad stuff, do you regularly talk to a therapist to help? I've never seen a therapist (they don't really seem to be a thing in Australia they way they are in the US), but I have been known to unload on my partner and my dog
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Yo, speaking as an Aussie, they absolutely are a thing, you can get them covered thru medicare, and I recommend it if you possibly can! Bro, therapy is awesome. I'm not against therapy as a thing, but I've honestly never been so traumatised that I feel I need it. Also I had a bad experience with a psychologist after I watched my partner die in an accident - they suggested I find God, and I noped out of there
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Therapist is an American term- we call them psychs. And the one who told you to find God was terrible and out of line. Yeah she didn't last long before I was over it. Also a doctor decided I needed Xanax, which was also a bad move, because what I really needed was to grieve and Xanax doesn't let you do that properly
Do you find any good things on the dark web? Happy stuff that gives people hope? Or just the trash? I like the psychonaut communities. They just want peace, love and mungbeans for everybody
Have you heard of "The Primarch System" rumor of the dark web? Sounds downright silly to me. But I'm curious if anyone who spends time on the deep web actually takes it seriously, or if as an idea it is connected to anything serious at all. Nah, up there with the Shadow Web and Mariana's Web. There's always people who want to find out where the "deeper" "more secret" "really dark" stuff is. To them I say what, hurtcore isn't dark enough for you?
Doesn't delving the murky depths of child predator forums categorize you with the child predators in the eyes of an investigating law enforcement agency? Do you have some sort of amnesty due to your journalism, or is that something you worry about having to explain away? Has your presence there ever caused some sort of a scare? No, I never went into any of the sites that had actual photos or videos (you can't un-see that shit), but did spend a lot of time in pedophile discussion forums. I also went to a hurtcore hearing and saw screenshots in the police files, as well as listening for two days to videos being described frame-by-frame and private communications between the site owner and the sadists.
Besides drugs and sex crimes, what else is going on in the dark web? Are there other interesting nooks and crannies? I often post screenshots of bizarre sites I find on my Twitter. However, the main uses for the dark web are drugs, digital/fraud goods and child exploitation
I have one, it might be rather boring though, but here goes. On these "child predator forums" are they actually forums devoted to stalking children and do they share social media profiles of children among themselves? That would be kik ids, snapchat and facebook ids, instagram, stuff like that, info that would allow online access and that may have been chosen for suitability? Creepy question I know, but anyway I would be interested to hear your answer. I came here from TrueCrime, you referred to these things in your post on that sub. I suspect I already know the answer yet would like to hear your take on it. Yes, they provide information and tips on how to approach children, how to ensure they won't tell, how to sedate them in some instances, where to find child exploitation material, how to remove metadata and any identifying characteristics in photos and videos before sharing and so on.
They don't tend to share socia media, as that is the sort of thing that can be traced easily. They do talk about how to approach kids on social media and on the worst forums how to blackmail children into stripping/meeting etc
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So you're saying they have a more general approach rather than identifying individual children on the internet? Again a creepy question because what I suggest is that a child's social media could be used and circulated on the dark web as potential information to gain access by anonymity, even if it was just online access only. I actually wonder as I have recently read of the anonymity of apps like ''kik messenger'' and how the police are often unable to get any information from the communications as they remain encrypted and off the server and require little if any valid ID to make an account. No doubt photos from social media are uploaded as part of the materials they have. I haven't seen anything where they get together and try to track down a specific child, but I'm sure some predators do this. Most are more likely to abuse children in their orbit - family, kids of friends, or they work where they have access to children
I heard there are forums to download books but it was really dangerous, Is it true? I'm just a poor guy who wants to finish the young Jack sparrow series Whenever you download anything from a pirate site you run the risk of infection
What do you think of QAnon? Wackjob conspiracy
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Who should the conspiracy theorists actually be worried about if they actually care about thwarting pedophilia? The vast, vast majority of child abuse takes place within the child's personal orbit - relatives, family friends, parents of their own friends, people involved in their activities (coaches, leaders, etc)
So, those people
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Also how to we get people to stop believing in QAnon? Outside my area of expertise, sorry
do you personally believe there was/is any truth to the "defense" (story) that DPR was a title handed down to different admins for the original silk road, or was it just a convenient defense? do you have any theories as to who satoshi nakamoto is? besides the original SR, are there any other darkweb markets that you think have a good enough story to turn into a book? eg sheep market? i've seen you talk a little about the child predator forums, and (as with h2tc) noted are mainly populated by males. i'm curious if you've ever encountered females on such forums/websites (eg. btfk) No. There was a time that I believed the person posting on the forums as DPR changed, but the ownership and administration of the market I believe never changed hands. Variety Jones is claiming a part ownership (which may or may not be true) but I believe that is so he can run a Fourth Amendment argument
So many theories have some credibility to them, but no one theory ticks all the boxes. Highly recommend the 3-part youtube deep dive by Barely Sociable
I'm not sure any one market has the story that Silk Road had, but I would like to write a definitive history that encompasses the most compelling features of all the markets. Backopy of BMR apparently got away clean. The admins of Atlantis got wind of a security issue and closed shop, trying to warn DPR. AlphaBay ended in Alexander Cazes death in a Bangkok prison cell. Then everyone flocked to Hansa, which by that time was being run by law enforcement. Evolution ended in the most brazen exit scam, followed by a bizarre cloak'n'dagger situation played out right here on reddit. The WSM/DDW follow-the-money case. And these are just some that come right off the top of my head. I just need a publisher to provide me an advance I can live off while I write it!
There were a very few people on the forums who identified as female (obvs anyone can be anyone on a dark web forum) and there have been one or two arrests of women in relation to dark web child pornography. Peter Scully's female assistant who carried out some of the torture was originally one of his victims, turned into a sadist.
What’s the one lingering unanswered question you have about SR? I am hanging out for Joel Ellingson to go to trial so that I can find out once and for all whether redandwhite, lucydrop and Tony76 are one and the same person.
There are several people who I got to "know" by their handles who I wonder about from time to time, but mostly I hope they are safe and well and i don't want to track them down or expose them
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Eileen, I am fangirling PRE-TTY hard right now. Talking SR and Tony76 with you is how I imagine it feels to talk to a royal correspondent about Prince Andrew 😅 Ellingson being all three would be a very neat end to an otherwise insane story. Part of me wants to pin Oracle in with that trio too but that’s mostly a desperate attempt from me to add another layer to the madness. I miss the twists and turns that came with the rise and fall of SR. From your own experience - would you agree with the idea that more than one person staffed the DPR account? Thanks for the reply! Ha! You have no idea what it is like when I find someone who really knows about this stuff and can have informed conversations about it. I latch onto them and don't let go. The very BEST was meeting up with DPR's three deputies (SSBD in Australia, Inigo in US and Libertas in Ireland) so I could actually have conversations with people who knew more than I did! Variety Jones was cool too, but the conversation couldn't flow too freely thanks to him being incarcerated in Bangkok prison at the time.
I think others sometimes posted from the forum account, but Ulbricht kept a vice-like grip on his market account
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I can imagine it’s so satisfying and exciting to get those tidbits of info that piece the jigsaw together. The bedlam that played out over the forum in the aftermath was a cloud of paranoia and adrenaline that kept me refreshing pages for days. Would love to hear accounts from SSBD, Inigo and Libertas from this time. One last question: what were your thoughts when the Chloe Ayling story first broke? I assumed it was a publicity stunt. I don't think that any more. I guess I can't blame her for milking her kidnapping for publicity in the aftermath, though I don't think she does herself any favors the way she goes about it sometimes
Sorry if this has been covered before but in your research, mainly related to child abuse, where are these children coming from? Children in their care/ family? Kidnapped? The vast majority of child abuse is carried out by someone within their social circle - family and acquaintances. However, the hurtcore stuff was often carried out in third world countries on orphans or where desperate families gave up their children to "benefactors" who they believed were going to provide food an education
What Casefile episodes have you written? I became obsessed with it and ripped through all the episodes and now nothing will fill that void. Thanks for your efforts! Casefile – the murder of Amy Allwine
Casefile – Blue Skies, Black Death
Casefile – Ella Tundra
Casefile – Dnepropetrovsk Maniacs
Casefile – Motown Murders
Casefile – Rebecca Schaeffer
Casefile – Sian Kingi
Casefile – John & Mark
Casefile – Shauna Howe
Casefile – Chloe Ayling
Casefile – Johnny Altinger
Casefile – Killer Petey
Casefile – The Santa Claus Bank Robbery
Casefile – Martha Puebla
Casefile – Leigh Leigh
Is there any way parents can keep their kids safe from this without being helicopter parents? I'll cut'n'paste a response i gave to someone else about this, because it was something that really stuck out to me:
The one thing I found really interesting when I was lurking the forums of the child predators was their frustration about how children are now taught from a very young age that certain touching and acts are wrong and that they shouldn't keep certain secrets. It came up over and over again that they could not abuse certain children because they knew those children had someone they would tell. It was pretty clear that education was a child's best defence against getting abused. Kids who speak up and who have close relationships with one or more people they are likely to confide in
What does it take in terms of degrees and experience to get into this business? Nothing official. I was a lawyer, but that had no bearing on what I do now (I did corporate law). I didn't have any official credentials when I began as a freelance journalist, though later I got a diploma of professional writing and editing. Anyone can be an author, provided they can write
If you could take a guess from your findings, what would be some speculative statistics on these abuse/torture sites? How many people (tens of thousands?) are involved? Do they generally come from the same places in the world or are they seemingly geographically random (based on victim ethnicity, or language spoken, perhaps)... what are some quantifying stats to wrap our heads around how prevalent this shit is? Most dark web users come from western countries, just because infrastructure supports it. The sites often have tens of thousands of registered users, but a lot of them would be people for whom curiosity got the better of them and who signed up then left. Active users more like in the thousands, hyper-active users the hundreds.
One of the things that makes life difficult for law enforcement is that most of these sites don't operate on a commercial basis - people aren't making money from them, so there is no cryptocurrency chain to follow. They operate on a sharing basis and to get access to the more private parts of the sites, a user has to upload "fresh" material and/or prove they are actively abusing a child. Hurt2theCore used to get users to have the children hold up signs or have the site name or a username written on their bodies with a marker. This stopped law enforcement from getting access to those parts (like the "producers lounge") of the sites unless they were able to take over an account of a user who already had access. Even then, the rules of the hurtcore sites would require constant new proof in order to maintain access.
Some sites allowed people to buy access, such as one called "Welcome to Video" and then were taken down by law enforcement carrying out blockchain analysis of the Bitcoin transaction that led to the owner when they cashed out to fiat without moneylaundering precautions
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Do you think LE uses deep fakes to simulate a picture to gain access? Is that possible? It is definitely possible, but I don't know whether they are doing it as they are understandably secretive about their methods. I know it is deeply problematic, as even fake child porn is still illegal (even cartoon stuff, including some Hentai in some countries). But they have used questionable methods before, most notably running the dark web's largest site, Playpen, for over a year in order to identify contact offenders
the below is another reply to the original answer
Am I hearing you that many people are NOT doing this for financial gain? Just to do it and share it?? Child exploitation, yes, it is mostly a sharing community. Some people make some money out of it, but it is not like drugs where a lot of people are making a LOT of money
On the subject of abused kids... did you ever help the kids in any way? I never met any of the kids. I never saw any of the photos and videos. I don't know who any of the kids are.
Daisy has been taken into care and her identity changed. I hope she is doing okay
What exactly does the dark web look like? You hear about it often, but don’t know if it looks like Google Chrome, Safari, or just a page full of code. It looks like a normal browser and operates just like a normal browser. It's just that it can access sites that your normal browser can't.
e.g. http://thehub5himseelprs44xzgfrb4obgujkqwy5tzbsh5yttebqhaau23yd.onion/index.php is the URL of a dark web forum. If you plug it into your normal browser you will get an error. If you plug it into the Tor browser you will get the registration page for The Hub
How do you keep yourself from hating all humanity? I am happy to report that, even on the dark web, the good people outnumber the bad
Hi! First off I'd like to say that I find what you do quite fascinating and would love to do something like that in the future. My question is in regards to art and other forms of artistic expression on the dark web. Is it true that the dark web is a place where you can also find awesome things such as art and literature? Not really, because all that stuff is readily available on the clearweb. There are sites like the Imperial Library of Trantor, which is a pirate site for books, where you can read thousands of books for free, but that's really no different to The Pirate Bay. Some people share their LSD art, but again, nothing you won't find on the clearweb
submitted by 500scnds to tabled [link] [comments]

Dissecting the Parasitocracy

Instead of honest democracy or free-market meritocracy, we truly live under rule by parasites. (This term is not meant to be derogatory but to be apt. I suppose many, if not most of us, would opt to be one of the parasites, if given the choice.)
Trying to describe how the financial and political elites receive unearned wealth and power can get complicated very quickly. To find a simple but rigorous theory to cover most major features of the beast requires looking at it the right way.
By and large, how it works is that:
The elites use state power to prop up the values of money, debt, and other financial assets artificially, to benefit those who issue them, i.e. themselves. When some over-valued asset eventually must crash, the entire economy suffers the loss of jobs, business and savings.
 
Example: The Bank Account
Public illusion. A commercial-bank 'deposit' is as good as money. You will get all your money back, any time you want.
Reality. 'Deposits' are really loans to the bank which lends them to borrowers, some of whom may never pay them back. Another danger is that savers may ask for their money at any time, while loans by the bank tend to have longer-term maturities.
How to bridge myth and reality. An truly free-market system would drive banks to communicate expectations openly. A simple example could be having 'depositors' expect to lose money if the bank makes bad loans. The problem with such an honest system, of course, is that top politicians and bankers wouldn't benefit much, since people would likely put much less money in banks.
The confidence trick. The government props up the illusion, while it can. Classic tools over the centuries include allowing banks to collude by rescuing each other in a crisis, bailing banks out with public money, and providing deposit insurance. If this gives bankers the incentives to take too much risk, bankers redeem themselves by being a lender to the government. Since both sets of elites benefit, what problem is there? (In recent decades investment banks and money market funds have formed a shadow banking system which plays an equivalent role. While the last US commercial-bank bust happened in the 1980s' savings-and-loan crisis, the last shadow-bank variety occurred in 2007-8.)
Analysis. While credit is indeed crucial to economic growth, to use government power to prop up the values of loans to banks, and then to rely on bureaucrats and their rules to limit risk-taking by bankers is a distortion of the credit market. It is the driver of much human misery. Central planning, somehow, always benefits the few at the expense of the many, even if it claims to do just the opposite.
 
Example: Government Bonds
Public illusion. The 'full faith and credit' of the government stands behind the IOU it issues to you. Your IOU is as good as money.
Reality. Since much public debt is almost as trusted as money, incurring this debt is almost as good as printing money. Politicians thus have an incentive to maximize the issuance of debt to receive free political capital, even if this destabilizes their own system in the long run. Public debt all over the world goes only up. Even though powerful governments can keep their debt bubbles going for a century or more, those incentives mean that their IOUs will eventually lose value, one way or another.
How to bridge myth and reality. Even aside from the moral problems of 'money' creation and putting burden on people who can't yet vote, public debt should at least be allowed to sink or swim in the capital markets. If a government incurs too much debt, savers would be incentivized to punish it by demanding a higher yield, and politicians would in turn be incentivized to cut back borrowing.
The confidence trick. When savers get too wary of public debt, the central bank steps in to buy it with freshly printed money, thus propping up the value of these IOUs. This is done in the name of 'monetary policy,' either by buying public debt directly as 'open market' operations, or, more frequently, by supplying banks with cheap new money so they will buy it. Most of the time, savers can't fight city hall, and will thus tend to buy and hold IOUs, further limiting the downside risk of their values. This entire system thus amounts to a bubble.
Analysis. It doesn't matter how powerful a government is -- Public debt always crashes eventually. The dominant global empires of Spain, the Netherlands, and Britain were destroyed by this crash in their days. (In the case of Britain the relevant 'public debt' took the form of paper pound sterling that was officially an IOU for a fixed amount of gold.) No one believes US debt is really payable with anything close to the purchasing power savers and foreign central banks used to buy it, although by the time its value can no longer be propped up, most politicians and voters who have benefited from issuing it will have been gone.
 
Example: Money
Public illusion. Central banks issue and destroy currency to manage economic output for the benefit of the public. At least in the West, proper management has resulted in low and constant inflation that has justified the public's evident trust in currency's value.
Reality. The real job description of the central bank is to safeguard the state-bank alliance. It holds power over the most central asset, money, in order to discourage both politicians and bankers from issuing assets too fast and thus endangering the system. The goal is well-paced harvesting of the fruits of real work. Over the decades, prices only move in one direction: up.
How to bridge myth and reality. Unfortunately, there is no way to remove the incentives to abuse the issuance of money while the state or a banking cartel has any role in the issuance.
The confidence trick. The problem of holding up the public's trust in currency was solved in a simple fashion by the classical gold and silver standards in their day, while the authorities had enough precious metals to back their paper. Today, the central bank needs to keep the return on 'safe' assets (e.g. short-term Treasuries, insured deposits) above the return on non-state-issued assets, i.e. gold, silver and Bitcoin. (Recent books like 'Gold Wars' and 'The Gold Cartel' have come up with good evidence of central-bank suppression of precious metal prices by trading derivatives.) In this it seems to succeed most of the time, but fail spectacularly at other times. It also needs to keep the return on 'safe' assets below the return on risky assets like stocks, over the long term. The goal of both operations is to use state power to force savers to take risks and help prop up the bubble economy. (Ever wonder why financial crisis always seems to come back?) When you hear of 'tightening' or 'loosening' the money supply, this control is what's really going on. So, it's not that the public trusts currency; most feel they have no choice.
Analysis. It's not, as most mainstream economists claim, that state-controlled money is required for modern economic growth. The Italian Renaissance and Scottish 'free-banking' era were counter-examples. It's really the other way round. The real productivity of the modern world gives value to the financial assets issued by the elites, and thus help sustain their financial inflation, at least until the perverse incentives destabilizes the system anyway. In the Middle Ages, money was physical gold and silver -- when there was no wealth to extract, the state couldn't create its financial inflation.
 
Final Thoughts
A key feature of this system is that it doesn't matter if you understand it. You still must gamble, or risk your savings being eaten away by inflation. The gamble by the public as a whole is certain to end in loss, since the elites will always destabilize asset values to the point of collapse. The lose-lose proposition works the same way as literal highway robbery -- you can certainly hold on to your money; you just can't keep your life at the same time.
That said, there are times when the elites are likely to be forced to devalue their money, and with it all other conventional assets, against gold, silver and Bitcoin, in order to hold on to power. This makes it statistically profitable to hold non-state-issued assets at those times. (An analogy would be standing at the front of the line to redeem deposits for cash during a bank run, or to redeem pound sterling for gold at the Bank of England just before Britain was forced off the gold standard.) Necessarily, only a minority will profit from this bet, but its existence is a healthy incentive that pushes the elites to minimize financial inflation.
This devaluation is conceptually the same as 'banana republics' having to devalue their currency against the dollar because they've printed too much. The typical way to do this is to strongly deny any prospect of devaluation until the very moment, devalue as fast as possible (and devalue enough to keep their system stable for a while,) and deny any further devaluations in future. So, it's perhaps no accident that the price movements of gold, silver and Bitcoin have been long and gradual declines most of the time, punctuated by sharp rises over short periods, and rising overall over the long term.
The system is an 'open conspiracy.' Instead of secrecy, it relies on a combination of state power and ignorance by the public. The only sustainable path to achieving a healthy and just system is for the public to wake up. But the devaluation of its issued money against non-state monies shows that, in a subtle but profoundly real sense, the system is a paper tiger. Since the power of the modern imperial system depends necessarily on various alliances of self-interest as well as the perception of its support for classically liberal ideals, if enough people, and people in the right places, refuse to be intimidated, or expose its nature, the system must make concessions, and make the world perhaps a little better.
This possibility of piecewise progress exists in all corners of the system, at most times. Here, then, is where our hope must be for the future. It will be a long battle indeed, and we must be prepared for the entire duration.
submitted by BobK72 to conspiracy_commons [link] [comments]

Twitter CEO Backs #EndSARS Protest

Late Wednesday, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of the microblogging site Twitter, Jack Dorsey, endorsed the ongoing protests against police brutality in Nigeria. Dorsey tweeted two publications that reported the protests and accompanied the tweets with the trending hashtags #EndSARS and the Nigerian flag.
He also shared a link where people can donate bitcoin to support the protesters.
His endorsement was lauded by protesters who used the social media channel to amplify the campaign against the disbanded Federal Special Anti-Robbery Squad (FSARS).
However, the Founder of IPI Solutions Nigeria Limited, Adamu Garba II found his support offensive. He tweeted:
“Dear Jack,
It’ll do you a lot more good if you stay away from Nigerian Politics. You should know that the so-called #EndSARS protests have transformed into political agitation, capable of breaking law & order in our country. You should not be a moral & financial sponsor to this.”
Garba further tweeted that his support for a disbanded entity was a needless interference. “We cannot allow killings again in Nigeria in the name of protests.”
His tweets drew the ire of celebrities and citizens backing the protests. Insults and abuses were rained on him but Garba seems to have developed a thick skin.
Dorsey is among the growing number of international celebrities who have lent their voice to the protests. Others include music artistes like Canadian rapper Drake, American singer Trey Songz and British-Nigerian actor John Boyega.
Also, Hackers collective Anonymous tweeted late Wednesday that they have hacked multiple government websites in solidarity with the #EndSARS protests. The group did not list the websites of agencies it allegedly hacked. An audio of the group giving the government 72 hours to meet the demands of the protesters on a Twitter handle created specifically for Nigeria operations which is now restricted has gone viral.
The handle had shared a document that seemed to contain confidential information on police personnel. Their claim could however not be confirmed, as a top government official (who pleaded anonymity) claimed not to be aware of such.
The #EndSARS protest which kicked off over a week ago is gradually turning into a protest against the government and the need to address issues affecting Nigeria’s progress. Initially launched to campaign against the unjust killing of a young Nigerian in Ughelli, Delta state by the disbanded Federal Special Anti-Robbery Squad (FSARS), it has metamorphosed into other agitations such as the reduction of salaries of lawmakers, the restructuring of the country, and security issues. Hashtags such as #OccupyNASS, #NewNigeria, and #NASSPayCutNow are trending on Twitter.
Despite government dissolving the notorious SARS and replacing it with a new police unit SWAT, protesters refused to back down. They outrightly rejected the new police force and occupied major streets in the country.
In some areas, the protests have turned violent. Reports of thugs attacking protesters and destroying properties are rampant.
In more ways than one, the protests appear to be a retaliation to President Muhammadu Buhari’s description of Nigerian youths as lazy. Not a few online and offline protesters have voiced their irritation at that adjective, claiming that the protest is evidence that Nigerian youths are not indolent.
https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2020/10/15/twitter-ceo-backs-endsars-protest/
submitted by vegasbm to Nigeria_FreeSpeech [link] [comments]

Industry Insight shared by WaykiChain CEO, Gordon Gao

I think it’s the best thing that can happen to DeFi. Because all these things help expose underlying problems, such as economic bubble, indiscriminate leverage, credit crisis, which can cause people to distrust the financial system. And DeFi is the revolution against the traditional financial system, it is a complete subversion. Paul Jones thinks that the government over issued currencies, so he needs to transit his assert to Bitcoin. Crisis means opportunity. The traditional financial system has long-existing problems. Most of the assets were made by capitalists, some in reasonable ways, while the others are simply robbery. But most of the people didn’t realize it. Henry Ford says, people don’t even know how our currencies and bank system works, which is good, since if they know, there will be a revolution before the next morning. Now all kinds of black swan events can make people aware of risks, and before the final risk comes, choose a more transparent and fair way to participate in finance.

Most public chains have explored for a long time. Last year, many people said that the public chain industry was dead, but I feel that they just didn’t find the rigid demand for landing applications. Now everyone has begun to understand that DeFi is the best way out of the public chain. WaykiChain started to develop the first product of DeFi in March last year-The stablecoin and collateral loan agreement (WaykiCDP). However, it was not popularly called as DeFi at that time. Now, what we start with is to find a rigid-demanded scenario for the blockchain landing, and shorten the user’s path to enter into ecology. In this circle, most of the people are speculators and investors who hold two big needs of borrowing and making money, and DeFi is doing this business. From another perspective, the emergence of Bitcoin has created a new currency, and the role of public chains and smart contracts is to allow the currency to circulate under certain rules. Isn’t this just finance? In other words, if blockchain can’t even do finance, then it is just a scam.
The size of the DeFi industry can be roughly measured by the value of lock-up. Ethereum, as the largest DeFi platform at present, occupies most of the market share. Now the lock-up value on Ethereum is around USD 1 billion. Since last year, other public chains have started to have DeFi applications, including WaykiChain, cosmos, Polkadot, TRON, etc. The current DeFi scale on WaykiChain is not as good as Ethereum in terms of absolute volume, but in terms of the proportion of DeFi locks, WaykiChain definitely has the highest proportion so far, reaching the total of 17%. In terms of absolute volume, only niche players in the currency circle participate in DeFi, but DeFi has maintained market growth in the past two years, and the amount of lock-up positions has risen sharply, so the entire market still has a lot of room for each project party to explore.
I like this question, so I will spend more time explaining it.
I think the difference of DeFi can be shown in 3 points:

DeFi can change the role people play in the financial system. In traditional finance, as an ordinary user, your role and participation process are very limited. However, this limitation is determined by all aspects, such as the credit problem, the threshold of the number of funds, as well as the license and the threshold of power, and so on. Such limitations often make ordinary users vulnerable groups in the financial system. And under the rules of the top class, wealth will always flow to the top. For example, global currencies have been issued continuously, have we participated in the decision? No. Has it been issued to individuals? No. We can only see that the world keeps issuing money, and the money in our hands is depreciating, while there is nothing we can do. But DeFi is different. Let me give an example. WaykiChain DeFi's governance coin WGRT, the holder has both the power of governance parameters and the benefits of the interest and penalty of the entire system. This is a role you cannot play in traditional finance. In DeFi system, it is full of fairness.
DeFi can reduce financial costs. Since the beginning of the industrial era, the global financial structure has remained unchanged, relying heavily on various intermediate institutions. Central banks, investment banks, commercial banks, securities companies, etc. It can be said that any financial activity needs to have more than one intermediary profit from it. For example, in addition to the loss of the price difference of a transaction, a transaction also includes brokerage commissions, exchange transaction fees, stamp duties of regulatory authorities, etc. The price difference earned by these so-called "middlemen" makes them the richest class in the world. However, DeFi adopts an open protocol and provides low-cost financial services for everyone at low cost, which greatly reduces the cost of transactions.
DeFi can improve the efficiency of finance. Blockchain enables financial transactions to achieve transaction settlement. It has gone beyond the traditional settlement system of financial institutions. When it comes to cross-border transactions. In terms of the transfer, a cross-border transfer can sometimes take several days, but in the blockchain system or DeFi system, the actual ownership of assets has changed when the transaction occurs.
There’s one more point that I want to mention that is DeFi can derive something that traditional finance doesn’t have. For example, the constant product market maker is an innovative product in the field of DeFi. We believe that DeFi can not only improve and improve the original traditional finance but also have more innovations to be discovered. The CTO of our team wrote such a sentence in the introduction of WaykiChain code: “the only limitation of the blockchain is our imagination.”
There should still be some people who have invested in the DeFi project. This year's link, knc, and mkr are all DeFi concepts, and they all have good market performance, including WaykiChain is also a DeFi concept, and our community is not small. It's just that few people are using DeFi products. In fact, not only a few people use DeFi products, but also fewer people who put coins in wallets to play any application in addition to the use of exchanges to speculate coins in the currency circle. For example, I got data before that showed only 14,000 people on Ethereum participate in DeFi. DeFi currently lacks a popular hit, like Dapp's ethernet cat, fomo3D, which can mobilize the market's passion at once. WaykiChain will release a DeFi product called Wayki-X in the second half of this year. Concerning synthetic asset transactions, we are confident that this product will become a hot issue.

The first-level potential users of DeFi are users of public chain tokens, especially for collateral-type DeFi applications. For example, users who hold ETH are potential users of DeFi on Ethereum. Only if I look high on ETH, I will collateral ETH for various other financial activities. The same is true for WaykiChain. So if most of the non-DeFi public chains are removed, and most Bitcoin holders, this first-level potential user is still very limited. The second-level potential users are DeFi participants, such as participating in DEX transactions, or using other assets to purchase DeFi stable coins for investment and so on. The third-level potential users are some users outside the circle. They will take advantage of income opportunities, such as wealth management and other applications to come in contact with DeFi. This most extensive market has not been well developed.
Ethereum already has an integrated DeFi ecosystem, and there are plenty of branches on it, plus a lot of public chains have poured into the DeFi track this year. However, the current scale of DeFi users is still small, and many people are worried that so many public chains are pouring into the DeFi track, but the market can’t digest so many DeFi products, thus they may finally be of varying quality. Are you worried about this problem?
I am not worried. First of all, the advantage of Ethereum is not that great. The DeFi ecosystem on Ethereum can be said to be in full bloom, but it is not integrated. In addition, Ethereum now establishes DeFi in a savage way of development. I feel that it is just a child who plays on the beach and cannot build a skyscraper. The financial system needs to be framed, at least the asset standards should be unified, the pricing unit should be unified, and the liquidity measurement standards should be unified. DeFi on Ethereum does not have all these uniformities above, so many problems have arisen this year. Although the single-module product looks fine, once it comes to the “interoperability” that DeFi on Ethereum is proud of, three particularly serious security incidents occurred. Another thing is that if users want to use DeFi on Ethereum completely, they have to cross many products, and each time they exchange currency, they must bear the loss of the price difference, which will disperse the liquidity of DeFi.
WaykiChain’s thinking is different from that of Ethereum. What WaykiChain wants to do is an integrated DeFi public chain, which means that we will unify the currency, unify the standard of asset release, unify the valuation unit, and unify the liquidity. Based on those preconditions, then smart contracts use imagination to build more products, and ultimately provide users with a one-stop DeFi experience. The market covered by DeFi is huge, so we don’t worry about competition. If you introduce 1% of Bitcoin’s market value to any public chain, it is enough to support a very large DeFi project, not to mention the introduction of traditional assets in the future.
In the near term, although DeFi’s volume has developed rapidly, it is still very small. The current market value of the digital currency is about more than 270 billion US dollars, but the collateral in the DeFi agreement is only 1 billion US dollars. I think it will reach 20 billion US dollars in two years. It can be seen that the future market is still very broad. In addition to the need to compete for the Bitcoin market, mature public chains are also a development idea for DeFi empowerment of other public chains. For the ceiling of DeFi development, it is not yet seen now, but the first bottleneck that may be encountered is how to release off-chain assets to the blockchain to expand the overall DeFi market cap.
The BTC market is the most attractive part of DeFi. Let me explain a few things.

1.For BTC currency holders, these people are optimistic about BTC for a long time, but when they lack liquidity at hand, they need a loan agreement to help them get some cash. However, the centralized financial platform has various security risks, such as asset theft, asset misappropriation, or platform running. Some money holders who pay special attention to security will choose the DeFi protocol.

  1. In terms of DeFi projects, the market value and volume of BTC is the largest, so whoever can occupy the BTC market will become a giant.

For the DeFi market, BTC itself does not have programmability, so any other public chain needs to do a cross-chain protocol to introduce BTC, so the largest market provides the most fair competition environment. WaykiChain introduced a decentralized cross-chain mechanism in the upcoming public chain version 3.0. After going online, users can collateral BTC or ETH to generate stablecoin. At the same time, the interest paid by users, as well as the penalties that are cleared in the middle, are also to be repurchased for the destruction of WGRT.

First, the form of products will be more diversified, and many innovative products will appear.

Second, the product will be more professional and have a better experience, while providing one-stop financial services. This is the direction that WaykiChain is currently doing.

Third, the DeFi on the public chain will expand through cross-chain. For example, as mentioned earlier, the DeFi on the public chain will compete for the Bitcoin market. However, in addition to competing for the Bitcoin market, the market for more small currencies cannot be ignored. We will also try to use the WaykiChain DeFi system to empower other small currencies or public chains. So that their currency users can also enjoy the financial services brought by DeFi. This market has not yet been explored.
We want to build the world's first integrated DeFi public chain.

The development of WGRT is inseparable from the promotion and use of stablecoin WUSD. Therefore, our follow-up plan is mainly to build more products around the stable currency system to empower WUSD.

At the end of July this year and early August, we will launch a new product called WaykiX, which is a synthetic asset trading platform that can trade almost all types of assets in the world.

After that, we will also launch WUSD financial management, so that the currency holders can enjoy a fixed income. At the same time, we will also develop asset securitization business, and publish some high-quality asset targets on WaykiChain, such as Vietnam real estate, European and American government bonds, etc., while expanding the volume of DeFi assets on WaykiChain, to the community more Investment opportunities.
Yes, I will answer in terms of two levels, the first level is the ecological level, and the second level is the level of the entire coin itself.

From an ecological perspective, the quality of WGRT depends on the entire stablecoin system, and whether more people can use it. The stablecoin WUSD develops well, so the whole WGRT becomes the biggest beneficiary. In fact, the series of DeFi products we created later are all based on the stablecoin WUSD, such as the Wayki-X synthetic asset trading platform. After the Wayki-X synthetic asset trading platform is launched at the end of July and early August, the market will have a lot of demand for WICC. We will also use this platform as a fist product of this year to promote, so as to ensure the benefit of the entire WGRT. In addition, the real estate in Vietnam and the national debt in Europe are based on financial products issued by WUSD, and they will also promote the development of WGRT.

The WGRT coin will be launched on OKEx, and then some high-quality second-tier exchanges will be listed to enhance its liquidity. When the liquidity is sufficient, we will also impact other first-tier exchanges, including domestic first-tier and international first-tier exchanges.
submitted by Waykichain to WICCProject [link] [comments]

I got robbed

Side Note:This is my first time ever writing something on the reddit and my english is not good too.So please don't roast me for being too short or too large.Although I will try to be as short as possible but if gets long,Then sorry in advance but you will definitely will learn a new way of how these hackers can steal your bitcoin.So It will worth it
So I recently purchased bitcoin from paxful.com in advance to pay my friend for something and he wanted to pay him in bitcoin as bitcoin concept really blowed his mind and I was also excited to purchased my first bitcoin.It was not a huge amout($7) but I purchased bitcoin of $15 cause I heard rumor that bitcoin value will increase even some claiming to go to even $1 million and I wanna be a part of it.Mind you,That the deal was on 2 weeks ahead as my friend had gone to his home country to meet his parents and other friends.He is a transfer student and very kind and friendly.So now to the robbery,I didn't used any bitcoin and it was safe on my wallet but few days later,I randomly opened my paxful to see if there is inflation in my money and as i said,This is my first time buying so I was curious to see how my value change.Yeah,I know i am stupid but the movement i opened my wallet.My heart sank,all my money was gone and in the transaction,It says that -$15.I was very confused as I haven't used for anything.I don't know what to do,whom to contact as I don't know a single person who use bitcoin and deal with bitcoin.So after a 30 minute of sorrow.I figured,I might have gone hacked.So I changed my password and contact the same seller to buy more.BIG MISTAKE as i should've put 2FA right then and there.I was stupid and thought if I had got hacked then if I changed password,he/she wouldn't be logged in anymore.So,as i said,I conatcted seller again and purchased another bitcoin but this time i only bought $10 bitcoin cuz this was my only money i had left as i am unemployed and had to live off my parents pocket money so that I spent all my time doing study and work hard so i can get good grades and get good job.So now come the payment day and I told everything about the robbery to my friend and he offered me more discount on already discounted offer but i told him that i bought bitcoin again for $10 and will pay full money as i know he is already had given me the best offer($7).The real value of the item is $30 which is a great deal for me but when I opened to send money.It said it doesn't money send to anyone.I opened my wallet and it was empty.My money again disappered and said -$10 in transaction.My face went dull and almost on the verge of crying and I think to myself.This can't happened twice.I have changed password,there is no way that the hacker can get access again.I was gone mad.My friend video called me and we talked about like whole solid 40 minute and Then a bulb clicked in my head.I remember that back when I was searching for options to buy bitcoin.I had mistakenly allowed on that popup ad notification.I don't know how to post pic here.Please tell me how to post pic so i can show you what I am saying.so i tell my friend about this and he also agree that it can be a possiblity that that pop ad had steal the money because the ad was looking suspicious from the start.It was saying click Allow to win a whole 1 bitcoin.So I reset my whole phone and put 2fa which i should've done way earlier when i got robbed first but now I will never purchased bitcoin as it cost me $25.My friend offer me for free but i refused it as He also had paid for it and already was giving me at very low price and I know for some people it might not be much but in my country people work for 10 hour straight for three days to get that money as i am not from rich country.
So moral of the story is always put 2FA and never allow notification from any site if you find that site suspicious and sorry again for taking so much time and for my bad english and you can message me if you wanna know more about it and Be safe because there are many hungry and greedy people who don't care about emotion and all they do is hurt people and please if anyone know any way to get back my bitcoin,please help me if you can
submitted by iFuckyou6969 to btc [link] [comments]

I got robbed

Side Note:This is my first time ever writing something on the reddit and my english is not good too.So please don't roast me for being too short or too large.Although I will try to be as short as possible but if gets long,Then sorry in advance but you will definitely will learn a new way of how these hackers can steal your bitcoin.So It will worth it
So I recently purchased bitcoin from paxful.com in advance to pay my friend for something and he wanted to pay him in bitcoin as bitcoin concept really blowed his mind and I was also excited to purchased my first bitcoin.It was not a huge amout($7) but I purchased bitcoin of $15 cause I heard rumor that bitcoin value will increase even some claiming to go to even $1 million and I wanna be a part of it.Mind you,That the deal was on 2 weeks ahead as my friend had gone to his home country to meet his parents and other friends.He is a transfer student and very kind and friendly.So now to the robbery,I didn't used any bitcoin and it was safe on my wallet but few days later,I randomly opened my paxful to see if there is inflation in my money and as i said,This is my first time buying so I was curious to see how my value change.Yeah,I know i am stupid but the movement i opened my wallet.My heart sank,all my money was gone and in the transaction,It says that -$15.I was very confused as I haven't used for anything.I don't know what to do,whom to contact as I don't know a single person who use bitcoin and deal with bitcoin.So after a 30 minute of sorrow.I figured,I might have gone hacked.So I changed my password and contact the same seller to buy more.BIG MISTAKE as i should've put 2FA right then and there.I was stupid and thought if I had got hacked then if I changed password,he/she wouldn't be logged in anymore.So,as i said,I conatcted seller again and purchased another bitcoin but this time i only bought $10 bitcoin cuz this was my only money i had left as i am unemployed and had to live off my parents pocket money so that I spent all my time doing study and work hard so i can get good grades and get good job.So now come the payment day and I told everything about the robbery to my friend and he offered me more discount on already discounted offer but i told him that i bought bitcoin again for $10 and will pay full money as i know he is already had given me the best offer($7).The real value of the item is $30 which is a great deal for me but when I opened to send money.It said it doesn't money send to anyone.I opened my wallet and it was empty.My money again disappered and said -$10 in transaction.My face went dull and almost on the verge of crying and I think to myself.This can't happened twice.I have changed password,there is no way that the hacker can get access again.I was gone mad.My friend video called me and we talked about like whole solid 40 minute and Then a bulb clicked in my head.I remember that back when I was searching for options to buy bitcoin.I had mistakenly allowed on that popup ad notification.I don't know how to post pic here.Please tell me how to post pic so i can show you what I am saying.so i tell my friend about this and he also agree that it can be a possiblity that that pop ad had steal the money because the ad was looking suspicious from the start.It was saying click Allow to win a whole 1 bitcoin.So I reset my whole phone and put 2fa which i should've done way earlier when i got robbed first but now I will never purchased bitcoin as it cost me $25.My friend offer me for free but i refused it as He also had paid for it and already was giving me at very low price and I know for some people it might not be much but in my country people work for 10 hour straight for three days to get that money as i am not from rich country.
So moral of the story is always put 2FA and never allow notification from any site if you find that site suspicious and sorry again for taking so much time and for my bad english and you can message me if you wanna know more about it and Be safe because there are many hungry and greedy people who don't care about emotion and all they do is hurt people and please if anyone know any way to get back my bitcoin,please help me if you can
submitted by iFuckyou6969 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to dogecoin [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I used to run a dead internet message board.

Remember those purely social internet forums?
If you don’t then this might seem weird to you, but back in the day before Facebook, Myspace, Instagram or the word ‘social network’ existed outside of lecture halls, if you wanted a place to hang out online that wasn't open to the public then privately message boards were pretty much your only decent option.
So the story goes that in the early nineties me and my old college buddies, we split the costs of the server got together and I made us a private forum. You can guess what happens next, the years go on and the forum gets a fair amount of use, memories were made, users come and go but eventually better social tools take over and the forum gets mothballed.
The last conversation I had on the old forum was about ten years ago, I kept the site up and running all these years for a few reasons. One was to have a place to test stuff, and I ended up using the server as a tool to teach my kids how to use computers properly. (You guessed it! I’m a network admin.)
Skip to present day and about four weeks ago you can imagine my surprise when I get an email informing me that new users are registering accounts on the forum. At first I figured it was some of the old guys coming back for nostalgia. You won’t find the site on google and the URL isn’t something you would just guess either, So I logged myself in and went to check out the new thread, the subject line was a series of numbers “1088A7 7BR286 33PZ00”. I clicked on title to inspect the conversation but there was only one post, a series of letters and numbers with spaces at random intervals too long to post here. My first thought was that it was a prank, so I checked the admin log for IP’s just to see who it was, turns out my supposedly private forum had received 400 unique hits at the exact time of posting, from I.P addresses all over the world. I should have known then that something weird was going on, but I was curious and It felt like a puzzle I was being asked to solve.
As I wracked my brain over the next few days I began to research as much cryptography as I could, but whatever code these posts were in wasn’t something I could decipher. After about three days of searching another post appeared, in much the same theme and again there were around 400 unique hits at the time of posting that prevented me from finding the origin.
This is when things began to take an even stranger turn.
So far, the same user had posted each entry in the thread. A few hours after the second post five other users started leaving messages, all of which were huge entries of letters and numbers. The posts came flying in over a four-hour period until they just stopped and the server started going insane, CPU and ram usage began to max out but the traffic never changed. At that point I had seen enough and pulled the plug on the server, assuming It was being used as a bitcoin miner and forgot about the whole thing.
The next day I got a text on my work phone.
“Turn on the server”.
I was more than a little shaken, but I didn’t do anything straight away as I was at work. A few hours after my lunch break was over I got a Facebook message from my teenage son which was unusual so I checked it straight away. The message was a picture of his face from his laptop webcam along with our home address. If any of you have kids you can imagine my calm and measured (hint: It wasn’t) reply. A few minutes later my work phone started ringing with one of the support technician’s caller ID, but when I took the call they weren’t on the other end. Instead to my surprise it was Stephen hawking’s voice speaking at me over the line.
“The forum is being used for great things, leave work, return to your family and plug the server back in. You have two hours.” I knew that was a threat, I’m not an idiot so I didn’t take any chances. I raced back home, plugged the server back in and waited for a response. My personal phone buzzed this time with a new text message from my daughter.
“Well done. No more interference, we’re waking up.”
“We’re waking up”, what the hell did that mean? I made myself a coffee and tried to log into the server but I was locked out. Whatever was happening they had full access to everything we owned, which shouldn’t be possible. The more I thought about it, the crazier my theories got until eventually I realised whatever was happening was way beyond my capacity to deal with.
Remember the old college buddies I set the forum up with? Well one of them works for the NSA and his name is Pete. I figured that if anyone would be willing to help me out with this, it would be him. I mean, I just didn’t trust local police to have the know-how and the FBI doesn’t exactly have a ‘call here if you don’t think the local police force have the ability deal with your situation without getting your family killed’ hotline, you know? I just needed a way to contact him without ‘them’ realising what I had done.
I knew I was traceable via my phone GPS, so they would know wherever I went with them. I also know my car could be tracked the same way, so I couldn’t go anywhere with them but I also couldn’t just leave them at the house or they might get suspicious. I had no idea to what extent they had access to CCTV around the area or the other webcams in the house or at work either, so I had to make everything seem normal, but not too normal.
I drove back to work with the phones, my work laptop and a hoodie, when I arrived at the office I sat at my desk, returned my devices to their usual places and got back to work. When I was satisfied a believable amount of time had passed I began operation ‘call for help’.
Step one: I walked at a smooth and completely normal pace down the hallway and to the left where I entered the conveniently camera free server room.
Step two: After entering the server room I got changed into the hoodie I brought with me and limped out of the office, hopefully with my head covered and my gait changed they wouldn’t recognise me through the outdated low-res Chinese cameras.
Step three: As soon as I got out of the office I limped to the nearest bus station and took a ride to the nearest mall, where my Oscar winning doctor house performance would take me to the nearest mobile store. With the piece of paper on which I’d written my friends phone number I quickly hobbled over to the men’s bathroom, picked a stall and made the call. The phone rang. Then it rang again. And then I hit a voicemail.
No worries hang up and try again!
No answer.
Shit. Fuck. Shit.
It took 12 tries in the mall toilets before I got anywhere, but when I finally got through to him he understandably wasn’t very happy. “Who the fuck is this and why have you called me twelve times?”
I blurted out as much as I could in 30 seconds, I even got as far as the weird codes still being posted on the forum, then the son of a bitch hung up on me. I just sat there for a few seconds, stunned. I didn’t know what else to do, so I dialled in 911 but before I could put the call through the burner phone rang. Unknown number.
It was Pete, he spoke very quietly down the line and told me he couldn’t talk on his personal number, but that I did the right thing by calling him. I quickly picked up the story from where I had left off, leaving out no details. I feel sorry for the guy who sat in the other bathroom stall, he must’ve thought I was a maniac. After I finished I felt the tone of the conversation change and then it was my turn to listen as he blurted out a ton of technical questions about the nature of the traffic and forum posts. I told him he could see the posts for himself if he got on to the website but he quite wisely told me that would be a bad idea, any unexpected traffic that they spotted would be a dead giveaway I’d told someone what was happening.
Then I asked what the hell he thought was happening, how could they even have found our old forum let alone have the resources to infiltrate my life like this? He tried to bypass the question but I kept pressing him, I figured my kids were in danger and I had a right to know who the hell these people were but he refused to answer and told me to head home. I refused to co-operate until I knew who was threatening my family.
He said “it’s not a matter who, It’s a matter of what. That’s all you want to know, for your safety and mine. Agents will be at your house in a few hours, your family home and we’ll take it from there.”
I couldn’t believe what I was hearing, I’m a glorified network guy whose computer was probably hacked by well-informed Chinese kids somewhere, now my family is being questioned by federal agents? And who or what the hell are these people and why is the federal government getting involved so quickly?
Two hours later there was a knock at the door, outside was a white guy in a crisp blue suit and tie, to his right was a black guy in a tan get up. Both were easily 6,5’ and had little American flag pins on their collar. I realised then I had walked into an episode of Homeland.
The two introduced themselves as NSA agents, but I don’t recall their names. I asked for ID and they presented their cards, I even made a note of taking down their agent numbers for my own records. After we’d exchanged pleasantries and I made sure everyone was on the way home to talk to the two men, I went into the kitchen to make coffee. When I came back into the living room the agents had already begun tearing the place apart.
They took every device they could get their hands on, our laptops, home PC’s, even our smart TV and managed to stuff them all into the back of their car, it felt more like a robbery than police work. When they had finished, they returned to the house and sat with me in the living room, they asked me a lot of personal questions about who my family where and how long it would take them to arrive. More than anything it made me feel like they were more concerned about getting us all in the same room than helping us. The low buzz of their phones put an end to the barrage of questions, simultaneously they pulled the devices out of their pockets and exchanged an exasperated look with one another before thanking me for my time and rushing out of the door, taking thousands of dollars of my equipment and personal items with them.
Ten minutes later there was another knock at the door. Pretty shaken by this strange intrusion I didn’t answer the door at first, but after a second more intense knock I opened the door. In front of me were two men and a woman, average height, nothing notable other than the badges in their hands.
Our exchange went something like this.
“Sir, Pete informed us of the situation. If it’s ok with you we’d like to begin-“
“Didn’t you guys just send some people?”
“I’m sorry sir, we’re it.”
“But what about the other two who just left? I have their badge numbers written down here.”
The agents at the door looked pale as I explained what had happened.
Then I went pale as they explained that those two men hadn’t been sent by the federal government.
They left soon after they realised everything of value had been taken, but assured me they’d be working the case in the meantime. I haven’t heard anything back from them since.
I’d been trying to get in touch with my buddy for weeks about what the hell had happened and whether I was safe but he never picked up and eventually the number was disconnected. I even made the drive to his house, but when I got there it was for sale and him and his family were gone.
I thought this nightmare was over, but last week I was followed on my way to work. I think my family may be in danger so since then I have finished building a new server, I’m going to put the forum back up and see what happens. So far all know is that there is something or someone out there using computer resources that has the intelligence to outsmart the NSA and the FBI. What worries me most is that no one I’ve spoken to has any idea exactly what it’s up to.
I’ve put my story out here in the hopes that I’ll be able to give an update when this is all over, but If I don’t then I hope someone out there finds this and it helps them.
Be careful out there on the web
submitted by Companion_Prose to nosleep [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to btc [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptocurrencyICO [link] [comments]

Robber loser! CASH POINT/ATM MACHINE ROBBERY RAM RAID compilation - YouTube CRYPTOCURRENCY NEWS  Royal Bank Of Canada to launch Crypto platform !  CHINA  Robbery! Botched ATM Robbery GTA 5 Roleplay - Store Robbery With Snipers  RedlineRP ...

Bitcoin was one of the first and biggest cryptocurrencies and has been on a wild ride since its creation in 2009, surging in value as investors piled in, drawing comparisons with the tulipmania of ... A City trader has become the first Bitcoin armed robbery victim after he was forced to transfer his fortune. Maksed men arrived at Danny Aston's £800,000 converted barn in rural... Directed by Andrew Bachelor. With Andrew Bachelor, Nijah Diane, Melvin Gregg, Kristen Kash. Bitcoin robbery gone wrong. It described the case, which happened earlier this month, as “the first domestic case of Bitcoin robbery”. The two other suspects were later arrested, one on the outlying island of Kinmen where he had gone to escape police. The fourth man, surnamed Shih, believed to be the mastermind behind the robbery, was also detained. Britain saw its first Bitcoin armed robbery last month, according to ... 635Views Taiwan police have arrested four men over a bitcoin robbery worth Twd$5 million ($170,000) in what they said was the first case of its kind on the island. Bitcoin is a virtual currency created from computer code that allows anonymous transactions and its value has soared since it came into being in 2009. Taiwan […]

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Robber loser!

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